English  |  Español

1-888-688-4222  Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line

Many people battle an addiction, often in silence and isolation. They do not need to battle alone. Together, we can heal our community. It’s time to share without fear, listen without judgment, and end the stigma around addiction.

We Need to Talk.

Start the conversation.
End the stigma of addiction.

Addiction does not discriminate.

Increasing awareness about addiction is the first step in ending the stigma.

Stigma involves powerful and negative attitudes and beliefs, which are often associated with substance abuse and addiction. When a person with addiction feels that others have these attitudes about them, it can negatively affect their self-esteem, damage their relationships, and prevent them from seeking treatment.

What is stigma?

What is addiction?

Addiction is a complex brain disorder. With addiction, a person becomes both physically and psychologically dependent on a substance or behavior.

What causes an addiction?

No single factor can predict addiction. A combination of genetic, environmental, and developmental factors can influence risk for addiction. Regardless of how addiction occurs, there are effective treatment options available and people can recover.

How do I know if someone I love is addicted?

There are some warning signs that can suggest someone is struggling with addiction. If you are concerned, be prepared to have a conversation. Be prepared by educating yourself about addiction, about treatment options and what recovery looks like.

Understanding the psychology and biology of addiction

Fight the stigma by fighting the misconceptions. Learn more about addiction, how it affects the body and brain, and why it’s so common.

  • Addiction is characterized by compulsive or difficult to control behaviors, despite harmful consequences and a desire to stop.

  • Brain changes occur over time with substance use. These changes can impact physical and emotional well-being.

  • Addiction can be treated and people can successfully recover. 

  • We all share a crucial role in starting the conversation about addiction.

Learn more about the brain science behind addiction.

Opioid Use Disorder

When a loved one is struggling with opioid addiction, it’s time to sit down and talk. Be prepared for the conversation.

  • Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) is the medical term for addiction to opioids (either pain medication, heroin, or synthetic fentanyl). Using the term Opioid Use Disorder acknowledges that addiction is a disease that requires treatment to manage. 

  • When people take opioids, their brain is flooded with a chemical called dopamine, which can create a strong drive in the brain to keep taking it.

  • All opioids are chemically related and, at any dose, carry some risk of addiction.

  • With repeated use of opioids, changes in the brain cause the opioid to have less of an effect.

  • If you feel that your loved one is struggling with Opioid Use Disorder, research shows that the integration of both behavioral and medical types of treatment is effective in treating Opioid Use Disorder.

Recovery is hard, but it is worth it.

There are many paths to an addiction. Luckily, there are also many paths to recovery.

Medication-Assisted Treatment:

The use of FDA-approved medications to help the brain recover from opioid addiction.

Find out more about Medication-Assisted Treatment

Find Medication-Assisted Treatment in Arizona

Counseling:

Helps with understanding and changing one’s behaviors, thoughts, and feelings.

Find the right counselor

12-step programs:

Free support groups that focus on sobriety and spiritual growth.

Find NA meetings near you

1-888-688-4222  Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line

Addiction does not discriminate.

Understanding the psychology and biology of addiction

Opioid Use Disorder

Recovery is hard, but it is worth it.

1-888-688-4222  Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line

Learn more about opioid addiction and connect with resources by calling
the Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line at 1-888-688-4222.

Learn more about opioid addiction and connect with resources by calling
the Arizona Opioid Assistance and Referral Line at 1-888-688-4222

English  |  Español